What Quarter Lifers Need: CALM

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In this hectic culture we live in, quarter lifers are forgetting to practice self­-care, take time to reduce stress levels, and create mindfulness in their daily lives. They are in need of identifying sources of stress and strategizing ways to mitigate them, learning how to say ‘no’ more often, and investing in their well being before investing in others’.

So believe it or not, researchers are calling our generation the most ‘stressed out’ to date. An article from Business Insider stated that “Millennials (aged 18 to 35) and Gen Xers (36 to 49) are significantly more stressed than the “average” stress level, while older generations struggle less with stress.”

A local study at Centennial College found that “Millennials who are currently entering or adjusting to the workforce are stressed ­­ really stressed. Three­-quarters of millennials (aged 18 to 34) report losing sleep due to stress and one­-third of them rank their overall stress level as eight out of 10 or higher. This number is almost 2.5 times higher than what was reported by their parents’ demographic, aged 55+.”

I believe that the root of this stress comes from the societal constructs that have set our generation up for intense academic competition that manifests itself into all aspects of our lives including hobbies, sports, volunteerism, identity, and relationships. Another contributor to quarter life stress today is the pressure we feel from our families. Most millennials are hungry for validation and approval from those who have put pressure on them from an early age. One of the seven characteristics of millennials named by researchers, Howe and Strauss, is that we are ‘pressured.’ “Parents of the Millennial generation tend to encourage their adolescent children in their pursuit of higher education. The enthusiastic support extended along with a high degree of parental involvement and pressure may significantly shape Millennials’ attitude towards achievement.”

The average quarter lifer today is the definition of hyperconnected, this a window to more competition online with so much ease to see what everyone else is up to. A dissertation titled Mindfulness for the Millennial Generation: A Clinician’s Handbook for College Counselling Centers from the School of Professional Psychology Wright State University stated: “Current socio­-cultural shifts are geared towards generating a more stressful and hyperconnected life, with little room for “switching­-off.” Nevertheless, it is important to have 31 moments to recharge, moments that help one to regain the physical and psychological energies expended during course of the day or week.” I can speak for myself when I say that I have developed some bad habits around my use of social media and my phone. When I am mindful of it, I notice that my phone is never further than 6 feet away from me at any given time and I check it incessantly for activity. Our phones and apps have become an extension of who we are and lead to anxiety around missing out or having to be responsive on multiple platforms all day long.

Another challenge is that it’s difficult to get on top of things when you’re in your 20’s and 30’s ­ always feeling like you’re playing catch up. Whether it be with your student debt, massive rent cheques every month, job precarity, lack of experience, or wasted time. Meg Jay, writer of The Defining Decade, describes the workforce climate that young people are walking into today: “The Great Recession and its continuing aftermath have left many twenty­somethings feeling naïve, even devastated. Twenty­somethings are more educated than ever before, but a smaller percentage find work after college. Many entry­-level jobs have gone overseas, making it more difficult for twenty­somethings to gain a foothold at home. With a contracting economy and a growing population, unemployment is at its highest in decades. An unpaid internship is the new starter job. About a quarter of twenty­somethings are out of work and another quarter work only part­-time. Twenty­somethings who do have paying jobs earn less than their 1970s counterparts when adjusted for inflation.”

Stress is a perpetual cycle wherein most folks cope with it in unhealthy ways such as overeating, drinking, smoking, etc., and then wind up being even more stressed about their unhealthy habits. In fact, I’ve even heard some say that they are stressed about being stressed!

 This is where I can help.  One on One coaching with me through the CALM Package will help you reduce your stress and get a good handle on your life.

What You’ll Gain:

>Strategies for self­-care that fit with your lifestyle, values, and needs

>The tools to reduce stress on the day to day

>A developed mindfulness practice that will improve your ability to stay present

>More self­-love and compassion; created using the audio script tool

>A revamped daily routine that serves you in a better, more productive and positive way

>More work/life balance

>A written monthly budget to alleviate financial stress

Okay cool, but what does this whole coaching thing actually look like?

What We’ll ACTUALLY Do:

>Guided meditation during each session

>Creative and hands on exercises to reveal what a less stressed reality would look like for you >Identify your current causes of stress

>Create an audio script based on the self compassion you want to cultivate

>Collaborate on both self­-care habits and mindfulness practice; one on one and homework >Revamp your daily routine to create more space for your wellness

>Create a concrete monthly budget for you to use now and in the future

Don’t you want to feel less stressed and live a mindful life?!  Don’t you want to set yourself up with the tools for managing your schedule, money, and mind?  Harness that little spark of courage that’s inside of you right now and contact me or read more about the coaching packages.

You DESERVE less stress and more happiness because you are WORTHY and BEAUTIFUL.

B

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