How To Become a Healthy Risk Taker

Copy of Copy of Copy of Courage Stories.pngEmbracing my risk taking side has always been an uphill battle for me.  I tend to be the more cautious one of the group and foresee the worst possible outcome before anyone has even considered it.  In many circumstances, having this cautious mindset has helped me.  But, as I’ve grown, I’ve become aware of the ways in which it has also held me back.

Quarter lifers may feel hesitant to take a risk every now and then for fear that it will jeopardize their chances at something, wind up embarrassing them, or push them too far beyond their comfort zone.  I think that by finding a real way to measure the risks you take and coupling that with common sense and courage, you can develop a side of you that enjoys healthy risk taking.  And I say ‘healthy’ because these aren’t risks that put you in physical danger or pose a serious threat to your bank account or wellbeing, but rather, they are risks that force you to grow a little quicker than you may have if you had just stayed static.

I attribute my newfound risk taking to a lot of self discovery and growth but also to new perspectives from people that have so wonderfully made their way into my life.  For instance, my partner Adam has been a huge source of inspiration and motivation for me.  He challenges me to push myself out of my comfort zone and into the unknown.  He’s seen me off on my own solo adventures and encouraged me to take the leap into creating The Courage Collective.  Sometimes, when it comes to risks, it’s grasping a different point of view that can really help you to step back from the risk and consider it differently.

Becoming a healthy risk taker takes the following:

PRACTICE —>  You will not find that risks will come easier if you don’t exercise your risk taking muscle.  Make sure you’re holding yourself accountable and practicing.  Be kind to yourself when it doesn’t feel so good the first couple times or when perhaps it doesn’t end as planned.  Look at it as though you’re creating life experience for yourself – whether it’s positive or negative, it’s super powerful.  My tip would be to start a Risk Journal.  Write in it once a week and name the risks you took.  Aim to take at least one a week.

SEEKING —>  Finding leaps of faith and comfort zone bursting opportunities takes seeking and curiosity.  You won’t find that your Risk Journal is filling up if you just keep doing your day to day routine and not seeking newness.  Think of the situations you’ve been avoiding, that thing you keep putting off, or those people who intimidate you.  Go tackle those situations and don’t stop searching for more.

NEW AND STRONG SELF TALK —>  Those risks are going to be wrapped in fear the first couple of times you take them.  In fact, that feeling might not ever go away. Equip yourself with the most badass self talk imaginable to see you through all the comfort zone crushing you’re about to do.  Practice self talk like, ‘You can do this, I believe in you, Your growth is important, It’s okay to feel nervous, recognize it and push through.”

Building your positive self talk is probably the trickiest part.  It will always be evolving and changing for you.  If you would like to get some one on one mentorship on how to create self talk that conjures courage for more healthy risks and less fear, sign up for The Courage Collective’s Courage Coaching Package today.  Consultation to learn more is free and student pricing/payment plans are available.  Click here to get the show on the road!

What does a healthy risk look like for you?  Get a little risky guys, it’ll do ya good.

B

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